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It’s OK to be OK

A lot of time has passed since I’ve updated my blog. Back in January, I was posting all the time. I was suffering constant flare-ups at every turn and I just couldn’t seem to get a consistent stream of good days going. Now, a week into April, I feel like I’ve found some balance. I saw a quote recently that said “If you happen to be doing OK right now, that’s valid too” and it really struck me as something that isn’t talked about enough in the chronic illness / chronic pain community. We are always hurting, always sick and often get hung up on the monotony of it all, but we forget to stop and practice some gratitude and praise for the moments of doing “OK” or even good!

At the beginning of the year, I did a bit of traveling and I feel like the more I started to move about, the more my POTS symptoms seemed to give me a break. It’s always been sort of a cruel joke that exercise helps POTS but the slightest physical activity can send someone into syncope, tachycardia, or any other set of unpleasant symptoms. But for me, I started small. My first trip to Houston, I used a wheelchair at the airport because my legs were so weak and I could hardly walk across the house, let alone across terminals and through security. People were giving me advice to try walking as exercise and it sounded like the most boring thing on the planet, but I started by walking around the block one time a few days a week. At first, I was so tired, I could barely put shoes on to get out of the door and by the time I got home, I needed to lie down and recover for at least an hour, just from a short 10-minute walk. But over time, I was less fatigued every time, and eventually I started taking my dogs out, each one on their own walk, once around the block for a total of two laps around my side of the neighborhood.  I continued to practice my standing and breathing techniques from the POTS Treatment Center any time I was faced with a flare-up. My trip to Tampa in February was wheelchair free and I was even able to walk around Busch Gardens for about an hour and a half. My stamina was much improved.

The thing is, the less I started to focus on being sick, the less sick I actually felt. I’d push my body a little more each week and listen to it tell me what it could and couldn’t handle. Unfortunately, my IIH headaches didn’t let up, so dealing with daily headaches was still a part of my life… But I slowly was able to almost overlook my pain and even call it a “distraction” or “discomfort” for majority of the time. This didn’t mean my life went back to normal. I’ve still had to maintain regular doctor’s visits, a specific diet, vitamin regimen, and my individualized treatments including nerve block injections, B-12 shots, biofeedback work, and I even added in Botox in March.

Every time I’ve had a breakthrough like this before, it has been tanked by a major setback. But that was before my body was stronger. I feel like I’m better equipped to handle these moments of clarity now. This doesn’t make me automatically discluded from the conversation of chronic illness or chronic pain. It doesn’t mean that I must turn in my community membership badge and hang up my blog. I still have a lot to say! And I think too many people feel better or go into remission and don’t tell their story, taking some hope off the table for the rest of us. I don’t know about you, but I always love reading stories of people triumphing over their illness, whether it’s a temporary reprieve, official remission, or all-out healing. One of my favorite accounts to follow is @avenlylaneinspire on Instagram. At one point, she was completely wheelchair-bound due to her POTS, but now she travels all over the world. And guess what? She still gets tired. She still suffers setbacks. But she pushes herself to enjoy her life the best that she can. Those are the types of stories I love to read about.

Whether or not my story is going to continue this upward rise, I cannot say. But I know that I will continue to put in the work and do whatever it takes to stay the course. And I won’t be afraid to tell people how great it feels to be doing OK, because even though I can now walk well across the room and get out of bed for the day, this part of the journey is just as authentic.

One reply on “It’s OK to be OK”

I love the message Lynzy. You wise to keep pushing and appreciate the success, and generous for sharing. I still pray like the dickens for you every day and know that also comes in to play. Love you bunches and am very proud of you ❤️

Liked by 1 person

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